Still Going Tiny (Picture Heavy)

My new Tiny Home in process.  Heavy metal bracing to support the build safely and securely.

My new Tiny Home in process. Heavy metal bracing to support the build safely and securely.

The bed is a full 8 by 10 feet, and the cabover frame is 8 by 5 ft.  Plenty of room for a Tiny Home.

The bed is a full 8 by 10 feet, and the cab-over frame is 8 by 5 ft. Plenty of room for a Tiny Home.

I haven’t given up.  I can’t give up.  My mother’s passing left me with nowhere to live while finishing up my Tiny Home, and I need a place to live, right?

Since the Original Oliver’s Nest isn’t even close to being liveable, I turned my attention to the truck I purchased to tow it….he (yeah, I know vehicles are normally a “she” but look at this beast!) is going to be transformed into the new version of Oliver’s Nest. I’ve even named it; meet Buster Poindexter the truck, also known as The Tonka (named by the guys who generously welded on the supports, created huge watertight storage boxes, and fixed the hole in the floor on the driver’s side).

I spent ALL of the money I made selling stuff in the house, plus did some bartering, to get the truck fixed up and welded, and to buy a cool hitch-mounted scooter carrier.  Here’s the link for what I bought: http://www.discountramps.com/tiltingmotorcyclerack/p/ACR-MOTORCYCLE-CARRIER/   I purchased the 410ACR, the 400 pound capacity carrier.  I had to really do my research to make sure I got something that is compatible with a scooter as opposed to a motorcycle.  The engine placement and the width of my Genuine Buddy are different than any motorcycle and some ramps simply won’t work.  This one should make it possible for me to load and unload my scooter by myself on the road.  I decided to go with a hitch-mounted carrier instead of a trailer to make parking easier.  If I owned one of those great, fully enclosed metal toy haulers, I’d have used it for its added storage capacity, but my solution is simple and elegant.  Here’s some pics I pulled from the web showing the ramp:

Saxith (my scooter) will fit snugly and safely behind Oliver's nest on this carrier.

My scooter will fit snugly and safely behind Oliver’s Nest on this carrier.

410ACR tilting rack

It’s lightweight enough for me to handle by myself. Important for a woman living alone on the road.

2008 125cc Genuine Buddy

Saxith, my 125cc Genuine Buddy scooter that frees me to travel without taking my home with me :)

ANYWAY!

Back to my revised Tiny Home plans. While Poindexter the truck was being welded by my awesome new friends Zack and Patrick, I worked on the framing and interior plans.  Here’s what the rough sketches look like:

Everything I need to live.  the bed area isn't shown, but will be 7 1/2' by 5

Everything I need to live. the bed area isn’t shown, but will be 7 1/2′ by 5″, over the cab.

Framing Diagram

Compared to the original Oliver’s Nest, this framing is simple! Going to use lots of metal strapping as this home will be extremely mobile.

It’s hard to see, but basically the shower/toilet area is in the upper left corner, the kitchen in the lower left area, the HUGE closet takes up the upper right, and the pantry, bench storage and steps are located in the lower right.  The entry goes between the pantry and the kitchen (on the passenger side).  a 40 gallon fresh water tank will sit under the kitchen counter, and I haven’t decided yet on the type of toilet I’ll use.

The framing will be done in two parts, a lower, “permanent” truck bed with insulated floor and walls, and an upper “canopy” that will likewise be fully insulated, and where all the windows will be located.  I am making it so the canopy can be removed to sit on jack stands if necessary, but as this will be my house for an extended period of time, removing it isn’t really a concern.

In between selling off stuff to fund my future, sketching plans, and dealing with some severe anxiety about life in general, I’ve had to go through my belongings to pare down even more.  I still have things I will keep in storage for the future, but even those have been reduced.  I probably won’t live on the road forever, and I hope to have a little place to hang some family pictures in some gorgeous old frames, and I have some books I just can’t part with, and would be very difficult to replace.  Craigslist, Half.com and Ebay are my friends in this downsizing.  I found that some of the books I am selling go for several hundred dollars each!  I’m glad I got to read them, and now they can be sold to help me financially and help someone else learn.  That works for me.

This is a long and picture-heavy post, I know, but so much is going on!  I could even continue, but I’ll save it for another day and another post.  I hope my current situation and solution is helpful to someone out there….as an alternative to being homeless or being trapped in a crummy rental place.

Peace, my friends. :)

Selling Oliver’s Nest

If you or someone you know is interested in picking up where I left off, please let me know, as I have to sell my Tiny Home.  A death in the family is forcing me to change my plans. I have put a price of $3000 or best offer on her.

Thanks, guys!

Parker

Have Fun While You Work Towards The Future You Desire

The ankle feels mostly better, and the shoulder no longer feels like it’s partially detached (at least not most of the time), so I think it’s healing too.  Been taking brisk walks with my pup Hank to get some exercise and fresh air, and to look at how other people make their homes “homey”.  Just to get new ideas.  I love to think and plan how my place will look, and to consider different setups for the exterior gardens and such.  The town I live in has one of the most progressive colleges in the States ~ The Evergreen State College ~ and the students (“Greeners”) tend to live an interesting mixture of wholesome and anything-goes living.  There are a lot of front-yard food gardens, chickens, rabbits for meat, and DIY projects for simple or even off-grid living.

So, I enjoy looking at what other folk are doing.

Given that the snow levels on my property get to an easy 4-plus feet, being able to get around to do chores easily is high on my list of priorities.  Plus, living in such a small space while potentially snowed-in and unable to get to civilization for weeks on end mean I need to plan for cabin fever.  Luckily I love reading and have a guitar I am slowly learning to play, and like to do lots of fiddly little crafts like jewelry making.  Oh, and never forget gaming.  Love a good pc or console game.

Anyway, as I was saying, I’ve been sketching out ideas for where/how to set up a greenhouse or two, the enclosures I’ll need for my rabbits and chickens, and of course, my horse and the few sheep I plan to raise.  I’m thinking about essential stuff like where will the compost pile be?  Where will the outhouse be?  How will I get to the different animals easily so as to care for them in inclement weather?  Now that Oliver’s Nest design is fairly set, it’s been fun to turn to these other puzzles.

So, I’m keeping myself entertained while healing up and waiting for good building weather to roll around again.  I missed my deadline this year, but next year will do just fine.

Peace to everyone.

So, How It Is.

I haven’t posted in quite a while because I haven’t done any work on the house, what with practically breaking my foot off and all.  Not sure if I already mentioned it, but turns out I hurt that left shoulder pretty badly too, and it’s still bugging me.  Getting better though, and I know it will heal perfectly fine!  I do believe in “thinking” our bodies into health, along with doing all the regular stuff.  I’m following the physical and occupational therapists’ recommendations and instructions, taking super-duper pain pills, and taking it easy, but I’m also thinking about the future I am reaching for.  I’m thinking about the present that I want to live.  I’m doing my best to accept what happened and keep staying positive.

Seriously. Don’t take chances that could damage your body.  Get help.  Use the right tools the right way.  Follow safety instructions.  I screwed up my plans – and to a small and non-permanent way my life – by thinking that the warning on the ladder not to stand on the very top wasn’t for me….I’m pretty smart and capable, all that stuff, but also, I’m indestructible.   Hah!

I’m still living in a very Tiny trailer, less square footage than Oliver’s Nest will have.   After my Oliver died, the place seemed a little big and empty to me, but time is passing and I’m OK and glad he was in my life.  Only real animal people get that, and everyone else just chalks it up to me being crazy.  That’s cool!

One last thing I want to mention so I don’t ever forget ~ an old boyfriend of mine, from years ago, came over and wrapped Oliver’s Nest up for the winter for  me, unasked.  How kind is that?   Like a big, half-finished Christmas present, really.

Cheers!

A Response To A Thought-Provoking Post

Over at a Laptop And A Rifle,  there is a very interesting post about the death/avoidance of adulthood.  I was inspired to write a response that is practically a treatise, and thought I’d post it here as well.  It sums up much of why I’m on this journey.  The link is to his post:

http://laptopandarifle.com/2014/10/14/thoughts-on-the-death-or-avoidance-of-adulthood/#comment-3521

And here is my response:

Fascinating. I have often thought of how I’m not “grown-up”, even though I’m in my late 40’s. I think I straddle the two generations ~ the one that valued stability and family over all else, and the one that values freedom of action and thought, even while battling a system that nearly guarantees financial failure. It’s an interesting view.

Unlike you, my childhood taught me to think for myself, but at the same time to fear non-conformity. To quite an extent, I raised myself (latchkey kid) in a time when that was rare. I suppose our parent’s desire/need to take care of us financially in an economic down-turn was the breaking point for the next generation ~ we grew up watching them struggle, both parents often working while we stayed home alone, seeing the difficulty and sadness of that life.

I am building a Tiny Home on a trailer to tow to my own property in the wilderness, miles from even the tiniest township. I know this decision scares my 25 year old son, but also impresses him with the idea of choice. There is a purpose right there. I want to live lightly on my property, therefor leading by example. It don’t plan to do much more than care for my 20 acres ~ thinning out stands of trees that were planted for lumber then neglected, for example, to allow them to grow more healthy. There is another purpose.

I too would love to meet someone compatible and live with love in my life, but so far I haven’t met anyone who can both cope with my mental health disorder and live the type of life I desire. Even one of those stipulations is hard enough! Instead, I plan on inviting someone to live on my property in their own little home. This is to continue learning how to be comfortable with other people and to have support and help when needed (and give it, of course). That’s yet another purpose.

Maybe I don’t live like a typical “adult”, but I think my life plans are worthwhile and meaningful, which is a good definition of acting mature.

Parker

Wow, Oliver’s Nest Is Looking Like A House!

Well, the building felt is going up, and it’s doing a bang-up job hiding the ugly sheathing.  Makes me quite happy.  I have to dig out my stapler/brad nailer thingy to finish off the edges.  I’m going to tape all the seams and cover the nails for extra water protection.  Once again I’m unable to do a “best practice” job, because no way can one person hold the roll, unwind it, keep it from crumpling or ripping, and nail it straight alone!  But with shorter pieces, well layered, I (hope) think the felt will do it’s job and shed water.

Here’s what things look like tonight ~

First the excess wood was trimmed off the bottom all the way around.

First the excess wood was trimmed off the bottom all the way around.

I don’t think I ever explained what the huge opening over the wheels on the south side is for.  Originally it was to access the water tank salvaged from the trailer (it’s tucked under Oliver’s Nest for safekeeping), but I’ve changed my mind and now the solar stuff like batteries will be housed there.  Access to them will be from outside through this space.

The paper has handy lines on it which help tremendously with keeping the paper straight.

The paper has handy lines on it which help tremendously with keeping the paper straight.

I’m not sure how to handle the window and door areas, so left them nailed but not taped.  For now, getting the paper up and nailed securely is my goal.  I don’t care if there are loose ends flapping in the openings.  They will get figured out.

Another view of the mound of wool.  It's almost dry!!!!

Another view of the mound of wool. It’s almost dry!!!!

I think I’ll be able to replace the sub-floor within the next few days.  I can’t wait to be able to walk and dream inside again!  This seems uanreal to me…that I’m actually BUILDING MY OWN HOME!!!!

The Drama Is Over ~ The Sheathing Is Up.

The last bit of sheathing on the northern side only took four hours to put on.  I felt so much relief to have it finished!     I think this last bit looks pretty good.  Had to sit down and drink a blueberry beer to celebrate.

 

Sheathing up all around!

Sheathing up all around!

Look at that sad and lonely little window.  It’s the only window on the north side because I’m trying for passive solar, but it is so plain on this side!  I’m worried about making the exterior look good.

The floor is now totally ripped up to allow all the pooled up moisture to evaporate.  I know what mistake I made ~ I shouldn’t have layered the rigid insulation over the wool.  It kept the water that leaked in from the exposed edges from having a way to dry.  I should have known to trust the wool ~ after all, it’s ability to drain and dry and stay great is well known.

So it’s all out now, and there is an immense pile of mostly dry, fluffy wool that has taken over Oliver’s Nest.  It looks like a herd of sheep exploded in there ~ in fact, there is more insulation than floor now.  I think all the fluffing has expanded it greatly.  I wonder if I was supposed to fluff if this much before I put it in?  That would explain why there didn’t seem to be enough wool left for the rest of the house…I just put way too much into the floor.   I’ll have to start stuffing stud spaces where no wiring or plumbing will go to handle the overflow.

2014-07-30 13.09.02

Mid-excavation. The wool hasn’t expanded to it’s full potential yet..

I took the day off today to rest my knee again.  It was really hurting by the end of the day Thursday, I’m not sure why.  It feels better now, here at 1:45 am, so it looks like I’ll be able to get started on hanging the felt paper.  I’ve read how-tos online and watched videos, so hopefully this will go smoothly.  It is recommended that you have two people work on putting up the wrap so it will be tight and secure, but with my house being so small, it might be OK.  We’ll see.