Still Here, Just REALLY Busy

Things on the house are changing nearly daily, so I keep putting off posting anything.  Which is silly, because now I have a huge backlog of things to put up!  I’m trying to document what I’m doing with the build both for myself and for anyone out there who is crazy enough to attempt to do what I’m doing (only hopefully in a less janky manner..).

I *plan* on posting each project up separately, but here’s a quick and not-at-all complete update on where things are at:

  • Windows installed (and don’t leak!)
  • Metal roof caulked and then removed completely when I realized I have a leak….
  • Wet ceiling portion and insulation have been taken down, dried out, and are  re-installed.  I once again have to say that going to the extra work and expense of using wool insulation is totally worth it.  That stuff is pretty much indestructible
  • Leak has been located, exposed, and the area is almost completely dry
  • New roof sheathing is primed and ready to be installed, tomorrow I hope.  It will go on top of the original, absolutely fine except for lots of screw holes from the metal panels.  This will make it even stronger for when I can afford some solar
  • A second gallon of liquid rubber roofing is on it’s way.  I didn’t realize I didn’t have enough :p
  • The interior walls are all up, primed, and starting to get paint on them finally
  • The ceiling is almost finished with it’s multiple coats of paint as I bought a cheap brand.  I’m cool with that since a gallon is a lot for such a small space
  • The exterior of the house is nearly finished, and I think it will look pretty cool 😀
  • The interior design in sorted out and I’m looking forward to putting it together!

So that’s a bit of what’s been happening here.  Thanks for sticking with me through the long silences.  Not many of you comment (which you should, if you have any questions or thoughts on this whole thing) but I know you look at the posts.

A thank you! for my gaming buddy who donated to help me get new roof sheathing when he heard about the leak.  You’ve been great support, and I appreciate it very much.

Tired, going to play a game, listen to some Leonard Cohen, and pass out. Take care! o/

Advertisements

Wall Experiment

I mentioned the other day ripping plywood into boards for the walls, and I thought I’d show some examples of what other people have accomplished using this idea.  The links will take you to their actual website to give proper credit.  Check em out, as there are some great-looking floors!

At Centsational Girl

A darker version at AllQuietOntheMidwesternFront

From DataCouch

And TruthsofaBlessedLife

Finally, DIYDork with a complete how-to

I’m once again using the cheapest plywood I can find.  The shop calls it “Utility” grade and it has a lot of flaws, which I think adds to the visual interest and a rustic feeling which echoes the exterior. The cost is less than $13 a sheet.  I’m starting with the kitchen wall section in order to hang the upper cabinet there right away. I’ll need to paint it before hanging the cabinet, but even with unfinished roughness going on, I like how it’s progressing.  Here’s what’s up so far:

PicShop-E5274624BA3095E092136FC7F6ECBFD6

Slits in the insulation netting let me push the sagging wool up while attaching the planks.

PicShop-53AB125FB2FB77F030CC7454BFC08CBE

This section on the left is from old plywood I’ve had laying around all winter, which resulted in a darker color. Too dark for my taste, so it’ll get a pickled treatment or a full-on paint job. You can also see the scratch coat of white paint on the ceiling.

Even though the skylight window is really dirty and still needs the sealant trimmed back, I thought I’d post a couple pictures of how it’s ending up.  Here goes:

 

PicShop-93A8ECE5EA36A16510F3B8B57858EB9D

The skylight well is looking much more finished, and seems to be waterproof. I admit to holding my breath and wanting to knock on wood while typing this

PicShop-D7808005D650A0A592C0E9E601A6D47F

Looking closely you can see the dripping nature of using EPDM on a vertical surface (not recommended by manufacturer)

The weather stripping applied to the skylight base and the door itself do seem to be keeping the weather out as it should, especially with the addition of the hasps when pulled tight and locked down.  There still hasn’t been a true rainstorm yet to test it, but it will come.  Hold good thoughts for me, ok folks?

Due to an unexpected and much-appreciated donation from a follower here, I was able to go out yesterday and buy close to enough plywood to finish the interior.  I’m about to go out and tackle that project today.

This house is taking shape.  The boost to my morale and feelings of preparedness is amazing!  The fear of being kicked out of my “safe place” is waning the more that gets done.  Leo is continuing to keep me company while I work, even through noisy sawing, drilling, and the occasional curse.  His latest hangout is on the bags of wool.  You can’t tell from the picture, but he starting purring when he noticed me snapping pics. 🙂

PicShop-1D3FE596C12C15C683CC29D4BCC0847B

Soft wool bed is the coziest place for a snooze.

One more thing.  Knowing that people are cheering me on from all over the world is an amazing thing.  It’s uplifting.  I appreciate you all, and encourage you to also tackle something new and intimidating.  It’s super empowering.

Be well o/

 

A Door Makes It A House

First of all, I want to make it clear that my door isn’t the best.  It’s a bit wonky, and I have to tug on it to close it.  There are some gaps that I’d prefer not be there.  It’s kinda beat up and scarred.  But, it’s on, it closes and locks, and it’s mine.  I made it happen.  In a year full of not-great things, this is something good.

PicShop-BD610196EACFABF5E1257A9EFE8A5699

Applying weatherstripping to the door

PicShop-DE9E481BA9FAD28BF890A19F9E8491E9

Exterior door trim

With some helpful ideas from a friend, I hid the siding mistakes today.  I had just enough cedar trim left to do it so I guess it was meant to be.  My friend suggested it be painted, but I don’t want to take the time right now.  Hey, it’s cedar, so it can wait, right?  So now the only thing left on the exterior that really needs to be addressed is the portion under the door.  I’m letting ideas marinate and will finish that part when a good idea shows up.  For now, it looks funky but eh, ok.

PicShop-EAB1A8CCA5D905884FC54DA953E4BEA0

Using cut-down cedar trim to hide siding mistakes

PicShop-DBB7BA369A65B768C9C1CA39BD9141D7

Closeup of unpainted cedar trim

The skylight is nearly complete enough for now, as well.  I went with white EPDM sealant for the corners and edges instead of trim, and I think that was the right choice.  That stuff is MESSY!  By far the goopiest, stickiest, glueiest glop I’ve used yet….and my hands were (and still are) covered by the time I was finished.  I really hope I can sand it smooth/er as I wasn’t able to make a nice bead with it.  It blends so well with the white paint that it isn’t too obvious, so I’m not letting that bother me.  One clasp is on, and I’m going to get another for the other end to ensure a tight seal against wind and rain.  No pictures because the window panes are still filthy.  So much light comes in from just that window!  I love it.

Tomorrow I’m going to start working on the interior again, starting with the ceiling.  The seams in the plywood should be easy to fill with putty, and then it’s getting a white paint job for now.  I definitely think a super-glossy color is in it’s future.  Once the ceiling has a decent paint job, the upper kitchen cabinet is going up.  I’m not sure what will come after that ~ perhaps the walls.  Sitting there looking at them this evening, I decided to fake-plank the walls with painted plywood strips.  I’ve seen that done on floors to a really attractive effect, and I see no reason why it won’t look just as interesting on walls.  It’s a quick and cheap solution, and I already have spare plywood I can use.  The wool is finally settling so I can’t let it stay up with just netting to hold it in place, dang it.

Leo is again in the habit of coming in and hanging out with me while I work.  I love that he is so comfortable in the space, and that he climbs the ladder to come inside.  It’s very cute and gives me another reason to smile. 🙂

Insulation And Roofing

Besides feverishly rewatching Heroes, I’ve gotten back into working on Oliver’s Nest with a vengeance.  The last three days I got all the wool insulation into the walls (minus the missing wall behind the truck cab). It was dusty and my eyes aren’t happy, but it’s all in.  Although easy to work with, by using the provided netting, I still recommend having another pair of hands to move things along faster.  It took me about 8 to 10 hours total, and with help, I think it would take less than half that.  Here’s some pictures showing the progress (wordpress wants them in this order, no matter what I try):

I had to cut and frame the back fuel intake door before putting in the insulation, so that’s another task off the list.

PicShop-D06CE55D3B913AAFAF8573991016B0DF

Back fuel intake door finally cut and framed.

It’s been mostly sunny so I tackled the roof, too.  I laid on plastic, flashed the skylight over that, and then placed the metal roofing panels.  As I still need to insert flashing around the sides, I didn’t screw the panels down.  I’ll be putting in the flashing tomorrow.  The rest of the roof will be harder to cover as I’ll need to cut down the panels.  I envision lots of cuts in my hands come then!  Here’s what I did with the roof today:

Finally, I cut down the door, which was super easy and didn’t take much time at all.  The doorknob holes that were partially cut away obviously needed to be filled so I cut round plugs from the cut-off sections and puttied them in.  I’m sure it will take a few days for them to dry, and will take a few layers to fill completely.  I think this was a good solution to the problem, even though a little messy  .I’m afraid I won’t be able to make it into a dutch door now, as the only place large enough for the new doorknob is where the split would have been.  I’m disappointed but happy I didn’t ruin the door when I cut it, so it’s all right. 🙂

I have a strong feeling of time running out.  All I can do is take the anxiety meds I’m supposed to, and work, and try to think as positively as possible.  And, do my best not to think of all the months wasted by being depressed and hiding in bed.  I’ve said it before and I’m saying it again: Major Depressive Disorder sucks!  At least I’m okay for now, which is all one can hope for.  I’m even happy…I’m enjoying being busy and working on my project again!

Do yourself a favor and try something scary/exciting sometime.  It’s a great feeling and I think it’s good for the soul. 🙂

Salty, Salty Words

I would like to think I am a decent person, with good manners and a sense of decorum.  Not today!!!  Working with heavy wood above my head sends me into a swearing aria!  I’m really hoping most of the neighbors weren’t home, and definitely glad I am in a country setting so no other houses are too close.  Tonight I’m a little worn out, and I can’t tell if it’s because I got a lot done, or if it’s because I drained my energy dry from all the cussing.

At least I didn’t drop anything on my head or toes today. 🙂

Sigh.  I don’t have a “pretty” blog….

Anyway, more progress!  Approximately half of the ceiling/roof insulation/roof sheathing is done.  There is about 6″ of insulation in the floor, and 6″ in the roof.  That should really help with climate control and somewhat with sound buffering.  I have so much of the wool left that I can really pack it in to the walls when I get to that step.

Some pictures of today’s work:

Fitted the joist headers (I think that's what they're called).  Used liquid nails as well as screws, as this part of the house needs to be really strong.

Fitted the joist headers (I think that’s what they’re called). Used liquid nails as well as screws, as this part of the house needs to be really strong.  The yellow bucket is 5 gallons of gray paint I purchased at one of the nearby ReStores.  Score!

I love the wool insulation.  I don't love breathing in all the little hair fibers. :)

I love the wool insulation. I don’t love breathing in all the little hair fibers. 🙂

Sundown and being tired forced me to stop at about the halfway point.

Sundown and being tired forced me to stop at about the halfway point.

A Helping Hand

My son came over yesterday and we moved the back tank’s fuel filler line!  It takes more muscle than I posses to force the pieces together, so he donated his strength to the cause.  It is so nice to have a little help sometimes, even though I wish I could do it ALL myself.  It’s an internal fight I tend to have over many things, but this one is too important for me to be too proud.  There are times when accepting or even asking for help is the smart thing to do.  We didn’t do the front one as it turned out I didn’t have enough hose clamps.  They will be arriving tomorrow so this should finally be completed by end of day tomorrow or Wednesday.  I so love Amazon Prime!

Needs a couple more clamps here....

Needs a couple more clamps here….

There was no way to move these things in such a way as to keep them out of the living area.

There was no way to move these things in such a way as to keep them out of the living area.

Looks professional!

Looks professional!

Before my boy got here, I spent several hours filing in the cabover sleeping area with the sheep wool insulation, and getting part of it covered with the sub floor.  I was afraid it would be difficult to handle the heavy plywood up there, but it went quickly and easily.  I was pleased to see that everything was square.  I have to use the truck and metal bracing itself as the “level”, and thankfully the ground is pretty level so it hasn’t been hard to handle that.  Otherwise, I’d have to keep everything equally unbalanced, if that makes sense.

As for the insulation, I discovered something interesting.  I pulled both some pink fiberglass and a box of sheep wool out, and found an ugly and disgusting RAT NEST, complete with a freaking large rat (which scared me and yes, I squawked!) in the pink stuff.  The wool, while a little musty around the edges, was otherwise perfect.  The box was super disintegrated from moisture, but no rats, mice, bugs, etc.  I’m once again glad I went with the expensive but environmentally-conscious wool.  No matter how I try, everything here molds, melts or rusts!

So gross!  Big ol' rat jumped out while I was moving the bag, yuck!

So gross! Big ol’ rat jumped out while I was moving the bag, yuck!

Completely undamaged sheep wool withstood the weather and local wildlife.

Completely undamaged sheep wool withstood the weather and local wildlife.

PicShop-94F5562747FBE3AB34C01C90B8BB8FE6

Once again needing cutouts for the metal bracing.

Once again needing cutouts for the metal bracing.

Last thing is I picked up a couple more windows from the local ReStore/Habitat For Humanity for $10 each.  I am not going to be able to use the gorgeous double-paned windows I already have, as they are not advised for campers.  The seal breaks too easily, especially for a house that might go four-wheeling!

36" by 18" Matching Single-Pane Windows.

36″ by 18″ Matching Single-Pane Windows.

Sorry about the picture placement.  WordPress and I having our typical fight.  Peace out 🙂

Insulation Medley, Anyone?

I have multiple boxes of sheep wool insulation that completely slipped my mind.  I dragged one out of storage, cracked it open, and BOOM, more insulation than I even needed to finish filling the floor.  So that makes it four different types of insulation in there: Polyisocyanurate, a different kind of rigid foam board, Roxul, and wool.  Kinda makes me smile, but it’ll work just fine.  Dragged up and cut to size one of the 3/4″ plywood sheets, but then realized I’d forgotten to sand down some uneven spots.  Sigh.  Back on the scooter to the local big box store for sandpaper to fit my little powered sander.  Now it’s too dark to work, so I thought I’d throw on a quick update.  Raring to get out there first thing in the morning to finish up the sub-floor so I can finally start on the walls.  That’s when it looks like an actual build is happening.

Met my first “travelers” today, by happy chance.  We chatted for a while, and exchanged emails as they know of some great places to camp and stay for longer periods of time.  It was pretty cool to talk to people who are already doing what I’m just planning…makes it more real…or something.

Tomorrow is also (hopefully) Beast repair day, as I’m going to take the batteries to my mechanic to see if he won’t start due to a problem with them, or if it’s maybe the alternator or cables or whatever magical mechanical thing is keeping him stuck.  Those batteries are huge…it’s going to be super fun taking them on my scooter…but I’ll figure out a way.  After all, she’s carried 10 foot long pipes, big boxes of random stuff, and even a window home once.  I love that scooter.  Ted (the mechanic) is also going to help me figure out how to reroute the fuel lines to the tanks, as the fillers reside on the bed now, which obviously won’t work.  I think I love Ted, too. 🙂

Pics of the day:

This is what sheep's wool insulation looks like.  Pretty much like sheep wool :p

This is what sheep’s wool insulation looks like. Pretty much like sheep wool :p

Inconvenient spot to fill your tank, believe me.

Inconvenient spot to fill your tank, believe me.  Apparently typical location on flatbeds.  I have two of these to reroute.

A little dusty to work with, but not toxic in any way, and super effective insulation.

A little dusty to work with, but not toxic in any way, and super effective insulation.