Painting Woes (And Another Leak)

I like to paint.  It’s easy and fun and colors, whee!  Funnily enough, the walls mostly will be covered by closets and cabinets and stuff, but I like knowing there’s something pretty behind all that.

After trying the pink painted high up on the walls, with a pale yellow on the ceiling and upper walls, I discovered I vastly preferred the white over my head. Here’s the before:

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OMG PINK

White reflects light better and looks clean and fresh.  Luckily I still had the Zinsser Oil-based primer to cover the other colors.  It took one coat, plus two coats of Glidden Extreme White Semi-Gloss Exterior Paint to cover everything perfectly.  Yes, I used exterior paint inside.  I also used it on the cedar trim on the exterior, after priming with the Zinnser (which is perfect for cedar), and had a ton left over.  Since I’m not living in the space, and since the oil-based primer is also stinky, I figured, why not?  There’s time for it to off-gas before I move in, and the color is just what I wanted.  I can’t afford to waste paint, or really anything.  This is one of the reasons why the structure is a little odd-ball. 🙂

After I tamed the yellow and pink, I started trying for the look I wanted ~ a blend of pink, yellow and tangerines. I have a favorite skirt that I love that is pink and orange, green and reddish, and I want to try those colors in the interior.  I have a little pot of grass green for…somewhere.  Here’s what I have now:

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The colors!

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A cool blend on the side walls

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The wall under the loft. I like this area the best

I like it.  Luckily, the area I like the best, the wall under the loft (behind the cab of the truck) will show the most.  It’s pretty and not overwhelming.  Other than some touch ups, and maybe adding a little red at some point, and of course the moldings, the walls are finished.

Oh yes, the leak.  It’s not the roof, although yes, there was a small leak which is now gone due to the new roofing.  It might have been present the whole time but hidden by the bigger roof leak.  This new leak is actually through the door/skylight itself…it appears that the panes of glass and the wood joints have loosened with all the cutting and hoisting and general messing around (plus the door wasn’t built to be installed flat, of course).  But I have a solution!  Today I will go out and buy some more razor blades to clean the glass panes, sand off the extra silicone everywhere, and prime and paint the wood portions.  Once it’s dry, I will screw on to the face of the door, this stuff:

Polycarbonate Sheet

Polycarbonate Sheet from Lexan

A glass shop right down the street can provide a thicker product than is available at the big box stores, and will cut it to size, and cost less than buying it and using an expensive saw blade (which I don’t have) to cut it.  Plus, they will do it right, lol.  Yes, I am farming out some of the work.  And glad to do it.  And yes, it’s another expense, but a necessary one.  I’d always known I might have to go this route, so it’s not a surprise, and I’ve had time to figure out exactly what is needed.

I don’t know if I’ve already shown how the exterior looks now, all painted up and finished, so before I get to work on the skylight, here’s a few more pictures:

So you are all up-to-date.  I’m off to buy those razor blades and a saw blade for finish work.  Be well!

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Now That I’ve Fixed The Roof

The rain won’t come to let me test to make sure no water’s coming in.  Not that I see how it could, as the entire roof surface, including up the base of the skylight, is completely covered in rubber….  It took about a week to remove the old roof and finish applying the new one.  This is another picture-heavy post to try and illustrate the steps I took. Here goes!

Day 1: Removed the metal roofing, with an assist from my ever-so-helpful neighbors.  The caulking I’d used to try and waterproof it is so sticky, I couldn’t get the front piece out from under the drip edge to the slanted portion.  I needed more muscle to tear it away.  That damaged the drip edge badly enough so that it needed to be replaced.  The new solution works, but it’s not as cute.  Oh well.

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EPDM caulking is applied and hopefully the roof leak is cured (not true, as it turned out)

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Caulked metal roofing

Days 2:  Painted underlayment plywood with an oil-based primer (I used Zinnser, which is awesome, and very versatile) to allow the liquid rubber roofing a good adhesion.  It took me a while to get used to this stuff, as it doesn’t spread easily, instead needing to be “dragged” by the brush and forced to go where I wanted it.  Each piece took almost an hour to paint. It does dry quickly, so if I hadn’t run out of energy I could have dragged the panels up and started installing them the same day.

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Thin and smooth, the underlayment I used to cover the original roof sheathing should be easy to handle by myself and also make a good base for the new roofing.

Days 3 and 4:  Glued and screwed down the wood, and covered each hole and crack with butyl tape and polyester cloth.  Working with the butyl was fun, like being in an art class at camp.  It’s like a sticky clay..sort of.  It’s often used on boats, as it’s unbeatably weatherproof, and even holds up if underwater.  It’s also recommended for use with EPDM.  You CANNOT use anything with silicone or that asphalt-impregnated stuff with EPDM.   The polyester cloth wasn’t necessary for the flat surfaces of the roof, but does give the liquid rubber something to grab hold of.  I bought it primarily for the vertical surfaces of the skylight base, which is where the pesky leak was.  I thought it might also be useful for the edges of the new roof, to allow me to cover them and yet keep the stuff from dripping down the new flashing.  It mostly worked.  I did have to wipe off (with mineral spirits) a very few drips.  I also think I’m going to reinforce the edges with uncured EPDM tape, as I want as much protection from low-hanging branches as possible.   This is seriously sticky stuff.  You’ll want to keep it in the fridge before using it on a hot day, trust me.  It cures in the sun over time, just like the liquid EPDM does.

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Primered underlayment is secured to the original roof sheathing, and now I’m using the butyl tape and polyester cloth to cover any and all holes, cracks, gaps, and around the edges and up the base of the skylight. The roller is necessary to smooth down the butyl.

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Filling in the cracks between sheets of underlayment

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I took a piece of butyl and rolled it in my hands to make a “snake”, then used the polyester over the top and rolled it smooth

Day 5:  This is really where I needed to take deep breaths, as it was time to open the cans of liquid rubber, and start applying it.  No turning back once the catalyst is added!  I need to warn you, this is potentially very messy.  Especially if you tend towards clumsiness as I do.  I ended up tossing out all the clothing I was wearing that day, including my shoes!  See, you have to use a special mixer on your drill, because liquid rubber is thick and gooey, and it takes a lot of mixing to get the catalyst fully blended in.  What happened to me was, I was standing over the can, mixing away, when suddenly the can itself started twirling on the ground, creating a good-sized geyser of rubber.  That’s how thick it is.  So, wear old clothes, and make sure the can is on a non-slippery surface.  Little insider tip.

Applying it was pretty easy, as it turned out.  You have up to four hours working time. First, dip a brush into the mixed EPDM and cut-in around anything necessary. Then, pour the stuff onto the area you want to cover straight from the can.  Take a squeegee (which you will have to toss afterwards) and spread it as best you can, and then use a good-sized paintbrush and smooth it level.  You will have to toss the brush afterwards, too.  Then, repeat the steps in the next area.  Each gallon covers between 40 and 46 square feet, so it’s recommended you pencil in lines on the working area so you know how far to spread it.  I found that helpful.  You want a finished depth of about 20mm.  I wasn’t working on completely level ground, but it still went OK for me.

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EPDM is on and drying. Don’t walk on it for at least 12 hours!  The seams show but are just as strong as the rest of the roof.

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Dried EPDM now needs hot sun to fully cure. This takes weeks, and depends on the weather conditions. It will continue curing whenever the conditions are right.

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Rubber-coated skylight base.

So there you have it!  If I could have done this earlier, I would have.  You do need warm, dry conditions, and fully dry materials.  If your area (like mine) offers that rarely, then try to find a workshop or garage to do this in.  It’s worth it, being that it’s relatively inexpensive, easy for a DIY-er, and should last years.  Any rips or tears are extremely easy to fix with either EPDM caulk or uncured EPDM tape.   Oh, and it comes in white and gray, too.  Plus the company will special-order colors for you if that’s your thing.  Good stuff. 🙂

I’m off now to hopefully finish painting the interior.  More on that later. o/

Still Here, Just REALLY Busy

Things on the house are changing nearly daily, so I keep putting off posting anything.  Which is silly, because now I have a huge backlog of things to put up!  I’m trying to document what I’m doing with the build both for myself and for anyone out there who is crazy enough to attempt to do what I’m doing (only hopefully in a less janky manner..).

I *plan* on posting each project up separately, but here’s a quick and not-at-all complete update on where things are at:

  • Windows installed (and don’t leak!)
  • Metal roof caulked and then removed completely when I realized I have a leak….
  • Wet ceiling portion and insulation have been taken down, dried out, and are  re-installed.  I once again have to say that going to the extra work and expense of using wool insulation is totally worth it.  That stuff is pretty much indestructible
  • Leak has been located, exposed, and the area is almost completely dry
  • New roof sheathing is primed and ready to be installed, tomorrow I hope.  It will go on top of the original, absolutely fine except for lots of screw holes from the metal panels.  This will make it even stronger for when I can afford some solar
  • A second gallon of liquid rubber roofing is on it’s way.  I didn’t realize I didn’t have enough :p
  • The interior walls are all up, primed, and starting to get paint on them finally
  • The ceiling is almost finished with it’s multiple coats of paint as I bought a cheap brand.  I’m cool with that since a gallon is a lot for such a small space
  • The exterior of the house is nearly finished, and I think it will look pretty cool 😀
  • The interior design in sorted out and I’m looking forward to putting it together!

So that’s a bit of what’s been happening here.  Thanks for sticking with me through the long silences.  Not many of you comment (which you should, if you have any questions or thoughts on this whole thing) but I know you look at the posts.

A thank you! for my gaming buddy who donated to help me get new roof sheathing when he heard about the leak.  You’ve been great support, and I appreciate it very much.

Tired, going to play a game, listen to some Leonard Cohen, and pass out. Take care! o/

More Progress!

The rain is back. Not that it was completely gone, but I could do lots of things between the semi-hourly showers.  Now I’m at a point where I need several days (and nights) in a row that are completely dry, and Weatherbug is telling me that’s just not going to happen for at least ten days.  Sigh.
Good news though!  The Beast (my truck) is running well, as long as I only use fuel from the front tank.  I believe the diesel in the back tank has water in it.  I’m going to call my mechanic and see what his estimate for dealing with that is.  I HOPE it’s not much!  I’m going to call tomorrow if I feel brave enough.
Here’s a list of what has gotten done since my last post:
-walled in the area behind the truck cab/under the loft
-installed the rest of the metal roofing
-installed cedar drip edging all around the roof, except for the front slanting portion where the front windows will go
-rebuilt the door casing (it was easy!)
-puttied the old doorknob holes in the door
-cut the hinge grooves with a chisel and hammer (not nearly as difficult as you’d think but a bit time-consuming)
-continued puttying the windows ~ it will be at least another week to get it all done
I’ve thought a lot about what to use for trim on the vertical edges.  Cedar?  Cut strips of the metal siding down and fold into an “L” shape?  Use metal flashing of some sort?   When it started raining this afternoon, I went rooting through my piles of building materials and found a bunch of old metal flashing that was given to me a few years ago.  It came from an old barn, and other than the screw holes and some more of that black gook that was on the metal roofing panels (they were from the same barn), is in great shape.  It’s straight and long and wide ~ perfect for glueing and screwing to the edges.  There’s enough to put on every vertical and semi-vertical edge on the whole structure!
I’ll spend the next week or so while it’s wet out to get the black substance off the flashing.  I also plan on sanding down the door and casing and getting them both painted.  Once they are ready, I can install the door!  I found a product that will make hanging the door easier:  The Quick Door Hanger kit.  It only costs $5, and makes it much easier to ensure the casing is straight so the door works properly.  I could use shims, but honestly, after so much effort with the door, I want a little ease.  Plus, I really want a usable door that opens easily and doesn’t stick or swing shut on it’s own.  🙂
My mood has been good.  I have lots of energy.  All I need is enough time.  Crossing fingers and toes and everything!

Insulation And Roofing

Besides feverishly rewatching Heroes, I’ve gotten back into working on Oliver’s Nest with a vengeance.  The last three days I got all the wool insulation into the walls (minus the missing wall behind the truck cab). It was dusty and my eyes aren’t happy, but it’s all in.  Although easy to work with, by using the provided netting, I still recommend having another pair of hands to move things along faster.  It took me about 8 to 10 hours total, and with help, I think it would take less than half that.  Here’s some pictures showing the progress (wordpress wants them in this order, no matter what I try):

I had to cut and frame the back fuel intake door before putting in the insulation, so that’s another task off the list.

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Back fuel intake door finally cut and framed.

It’s been mostly sunny so I tackled the roof, too.  I laid on plastic, flashed the skylight over that, and then placed the metal roofing panels.  As I still need to insert flashing around the sides, I didn’t screw the panels down.  I’ll be putting in the flashing tomorrow.  The rest of the roof will be harder to cover as I’ll need to cut down the panels.  I envision lots of cuts in my hands come then!  Here’s what I did with the roof today:

Finally, I cut down the door, which was super easy and didn’t take much time at all.  The doorknob holes that were partially cut away obviously needed to be filled so I cut round plugs from the cut-off sections and puttied them in.  I’m sure it will take a few days for them to dry, and will take a few layers to fill completely.  I think this was a good solution to the problem, even though a little messy  .I’m afraid I won’t be able to make it into a dutch door now, as the only place large enough for the new doorknob is where the split would have been.  I’m disappointed but happy I didn’t ruin the door when I cut it, so it’s all right. 🙂

I have a strong feeling of time running out.  All I can do is take the anxiety meds I’m supposed to, and work, and try to think as positively as possible.  And, do my best not to think of all the months wasted by being depressed and hiding in bed.  I’ve said it before and I’m saying it again: Major Depressive Disorder sucks!  At least I’m okay for now, which is all one can hope for.  I’m even happy…I’m enjoying being busy and working on my project again!

Do yourself a favor and try something scary/exciting sometime.  It’s a great feeling and I think it’s good for the soul. 🙂

Hey, The Sun Came Out!

It was pouring most of the day yesterday so I didn’t want to work on the roof and get it all wet again.  I didn’t much want to get ME all wet, so nothing was accomplished except some fine PC gaming.

Today however, the rain stopped and I took the opportunity to get outside and collect the roofing panels, clean them up (they’ve been sitting for a few months since I last cleaned them), and move them much closer to my work area.  It felt like the temps were in the high 50s, and for most of the couple hours it took, the sun warmed my back.  It was lovely. 🙂  I now have eight 10 foot panels to work with.

Before I can attach them, however, I need to figure out how to remove the thick black adhesive (?) stuck on the ends and around some of the nail holes.  It’s really chunky, will prevent them from laying flat against each other, and doesn’t play well with the liquid rubber roofing product I’m going to apply.  Luckily, it’s so old that I was able to chip off some of the chunks easily just be banging the edge of the scrub brush against them.  Hopefully the rest is removable also.  If not, I’ll be cutting away the ends with the black stuff.  I have visions of sprained hands and lots of metal cuts doing that, but I’ll do it if necessary.

As I’m writing this, I hear rain.  So happy I was able to work in sunshine.

I want to thank a reader/friend today for a donation towards this huge project!  You are awesome, and I appreciate the assistance very much. 🙂

I hope everyone’s Sunday went well, too.  Take care,

Parker

Not Much To Tell

Winter is coming.  Oliver’s Nest is not even close to being finished, although it’s nearly completely enclosed.  I was sick for a couple weeks, as in REALLY unwell, and mostly stuck in bed.  Lost some unwanted weight, so that’s a positive, right?

I’m at one of those difficult points.  Figuring out the best way to install the opening skylight.  I’m taking the process slowly, trying to tie each step into the next so the whole thing will end up strong, water-proof, and (hopefully) reasonably attractive.  I wish I had a table saw for some of the cuts I’m finding myself needing to do.  Having used one before, I know how handy they are, but they are also very expensive, and it wouldn’t be needed for most of this build.  So…persevering with my circular saw and lots of cursing.  The basic rectangular wooden base that will lift the skylight up off the roof is on, but of course, that’s not enough.  I know I need to figure out flashing (difficult when the roofing solution I’ve come up with can’t be done due to the weather), and I also want to devise a kind of padded bed for the window to rest on.  Hmmm.

I’m thinking about options for that.  Some kind of rigid foam that water can’t damage?  Does that exist?  Rubber “bumpers”?

NOTE:  The above was written a couple weeks ago, and I was so dispirited that I stopped writing and went to bed. Kinda kidding.  The following is from today.

Pretty, huh?  I agree wholeheartedly.  It's also cold and wet.

Pretty, huh? I agree wholeheartedly. It’s also cold and wet.

So much adhesive, everywhere, on everything, including me.

So much adhesive, everywhere, on everything, including me.

For the last couple weeks, the truck’s been covered with a giant, tough tarp which is thankfully keeping water from getting into the structure.  But I can’t let it sit through the entire winter without working on it, right?  So what to do, what to do….OK.  I called the company that makes the liquid rubber I’ve decided to use on the roof and WOOT it can be used in cold, moist weather!  Not hard rain, though, and that’s something that randomly, and often, occurs around here.  I’m going to be keeping a close eye on Weather Bug.  Also, the rubber can be used straight over galvanized aluminum roofing panels, which I have!  More cheers!

So tomorrow, even if it rains, I’m going to be outside working on getting those panels up on the roof (over 11 feet high, great) and deciding on their placement.  I already have the proper screws, so that’s not a concern.  This is a time I”m glad I have a boring, flat square roof. 🙂  Easy to cover with the roofing panels.  They will need to dry before coating ~ towels?  Lots and lots of towels?  Then I’ll cover the whole thing back up and wait for two or more dry days to be predicted, and…Rubber Roofing Crazy-Time will commence!

Please, wish me luck (and dry weather, and not falling off ladders).

Peace, guys 🙂