Windows and Glorious Light

This post consists mostly of pictures, as I actually remembered to take shots of most of the major steps.  Maybe this will help someone…who knows?

Neither window leaks, and for that I am grateful.  I’m OK with using them now instead of the wood windows, and in fact I think they look pretty cool.  They were so easy to install!

I did take the time to CAREFULLY drill holes in the plastic bottom, to allow water to drain more easily, as especially the slanted one could otherwise overflow and start draining into the interior.  Several heavy rains later I can attest to it working. 😀

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Cutting the test hole for the window in the loft.

I wasn’t sure where to place the loft window exactly, as originally two very large wood framed windows were going to fill the entire space.  I didn’t want it to be too high so as to hit the trim on the outside, nor too low for esthetic reasons on the inside.  Hence, the exploratory hole and a lot of measuring.

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After measuring inside and outside for a good placement, I used my circular saw to cut out the rough opening.

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View from outside.  The placement is good both inside and out.

The front is so ugly and boring still….

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The RO still needs to be framed. Yeah, I did it backwards.

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Framing and flashing is in

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Loft window installed!

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Loft window viewed from the outside

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Janky window trim

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Aaaaand, the finished window. Please ignore what’s happening up with the white drip edge.  It was fixed later.

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Finished back window from outside. Metal trim is for protection from water, but I’m not sure I like how much of it shows.

So.  Water intrusion is a huge bugaboo for me.  Here in the Pacific Northwest, water gets into simply everything, and then causes rot, rust or mold.  I do NOT want any of those in my new home!  Since I have so very much unused metal flashing, I decided to try to utilize it to keep water on the outside.  The way I installed it, water goes from the roof, down the outside of the flashing, into the window flashing that sticks out, and then out the sides.  Since neither window (nor the door, which I did the same way) leaks, I guess it worked.

The only thing is, there is so much metal above the rear window!  I’m considering cutting some of the left-over T1-11, painting it to match the body, and cover a good portion of the upper metal. I don’t know…anyone have any ideas I can consider?  I don’t want it to be too different from how I did the other window and door. Whaddayathink?

 

Bad Juju

I know it’s 7 years bad luck when you break a mirror, but what’s the penalty for breaking a window?  Dammit.

So!  Change in plans.  After the shock and horror wore off (could have been minutes, could have been hours ~ time stopped. JK)  I went in search of the new-fangled plastic, double-paned windows I’d purchased for the original TH.  Confronted with using either huge 3′ by 5′ suckers or more reasonable but smaller than I’d wanted windows, I went with a 31″ by 21″.  Now, here’s the thing:  I’d already cut the rough opening in the wall and flashed it, not to mention having to redo the framing.  Nooooo…..

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Rough Opening ready for the large wood window. Yes, that’s copper sheeting.  I was going to put that on all the window openings for a bit of style 🙂

Patching went ok, but now the back of the building doesn’t look nearly as good.  The patch is really obvious right now, and I don’t know if all the caulking and painting necessary will change that.  Plus, water entry is now more of a risk.  Such a bummer!  At least restructuring the framing went quickly.

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Restructured and patched Rough Opening w/o the copper sheeting, as it won’t show in this type of window install.

The upside of this huge change in plans?  Installation was a breeze, and I immediately had an opening window complete with screen.  That was cool. 🙂

Then the snowball effect kicked in.

As I stood there looking out my new window (yay) I contemplated the other two windows that were going in next to it.  No way.  Two old-fashioned (but cool) wood windows inches from a modern plastic window?  Nope.  I looked at the stack of double-paned choices and compared them to the framing already in place.  Nope again.  I just didn’t want to do it.  The single, smaller window surprised me with the amount of light it let in, so right there I decided one was enough.  This decision opened up changing the interior layout I’d planned on, so I spent the night obsessively redrawing plans.  Because of course.  And that wasn’t all, as now that I wasn’t using wood windows in the rear, I got really hesitant to use them in the front…and after checking to make sure double-paned plastic framed windows can safely be installed at an angle I’m going to do that.  So much less light, so much reduction in views.  A hell of a lot easier installation, so little risk of more breakage.

So a lot of changes, a bit of heartbreak, and much work later, here’s what things look like now:

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Framed, flashed and installed.

Before I go, here’s the latest pictures of Leo hanging out in the new place:

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Leo barely fits through the door opening, but likes to look out.

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Leo on the ladder outside. Doesn’t he know not to stand on the top???

 

I’m still working hard on the walls, and painting.  Stay tuned!

More Progress!

The rain is back. Not that it was completely gone, but I could do lots of things between the semi-hourly showers.  Now I’m at a point where I need several days (and nights) in a row that are completely dry, and Weatherbug is telling me that’s just not going to happen for at least ten days.  Sigh.
Good news though!  The Beast (my truck) is running well, as long as I only use fuel from the front tank.  I believe the diesel in the back tank has water in it.  I’m going to call my mechanic and see what his estimate for dealing with that is.  I HOPE it’s not much!  I’m going to call tomorrow if I feel brave enough.
Here’s a list of what has gotten done since my last post:
-walled in the area behind the truck cab/under the loft
-installed the rest of the metal roofing
-installed cedar drip edging all around the roof, except for the front slanting portion where the front windows will go
-rebuilt the door casing (it was easy!)
-puttied the old doorknob holes in the door
-cut the hinge grooves with a chisel and hammer (not nearly as difficult as you’d think but a bit time-consuming)
-continued puttying the windows ~ it will be at least another week to get it all done
I’ve thought a lot about what to use for trim on the vertical edges.  Cedar?  Cut strips of the metal siding down and fold into an “L” shape?  Use metal flashing of some sort?   When it started raining this afternoon, I went rooting through my piles of building materials and found a bunch of old metal flashing that was given to me a few years ago.  It came from an old barn, and other than the screw holes and some more of that black gook that was on the metal roofing panels (they were from the same barn), is in great shape.  It’s straight and long and wide ~ perfect for glueing and screwing to the edges.  There’s enough to put on every vertical and semi-vertical edge on the whole structure!
I’ll spend the next week or so while it’s wet out to get the black substance off the flashing.  I also plan on sanding down the door and casing and getting them both painted.  Once they are ready, I can install the door!  I found a product that will make hanging the door easier:  The Quick Door Hanger kit.  It only costs $5, and makes it much easier to ensure the casing is straight so the door works properly.  I could use shims, but honestly, after so much effort with the door, I want a little ease.  Plus, I really want a usable door that opens easily and doesn’t stick or swing shut on it’s own.  🙂
My mood has been good.  I have lots of energy.  All I need is enough time.  Crossing fingers and toes and everything!

Insulation And Roofing

Besides feverishly rewatching Heroes, I’ve gotten back into working on Oliver’s Nest with a vengeance.  The last three days I got all the wool insulation into the walls (minus the missing wall behind the truck cab). It was dusty and my eyes aren’t happy, but it’s all in.  Although easy to work with, by using the provided netting, I still recommend having another pair of hands to move things along faster.  It took me about 8 to 10 hours total, and with help, I think it would take less than half that.  Here’s some pictures showing the progress (wordpress wants them in this order, no matter what I try):

I had to cut and frame the back fuel intake door before putting in the insulation, so that’s another task off the list.

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Back fuel intake door finally cut and framed.

It’s been mostly sunny so I tackled the roof, too.  I laid on plastic, flashed the skylight over that, and then placed the metal roofing panels.  As I still need to insert flashing around the sides, I didn’t screw the panels down.  I’ll be putting in the flashing tomorrow.  The rest of the roof will be harder to cover as I’ll need to cut down the panels.  I envision lots of cuts in my hands come then!  Here’s what I did with the roof today:

Finally, I cut down the door, which was super easy and didn’t take much time at all.  The doorknob holes that were partially cut away obviously needed to be filled so I cut round plugs from the cut-off sections and puttied them in.  I’m sure it will take a few days for them to dry, and will take a few layers to fill completely.  I think this was a good solution to the problem, even though a little messy  .I’m afraid I won’t be able to make it into a dutch door now, as the only place large enough for the new doorknob is where the split would have been.  I’m disappointed but happy I didn’t ruin the door when I cut it, so it’s all right. 🙂

I have a strong feeling of time running out.  All I can do is take the anxiety meds I’m supposed to, and work, and try to think as positively as possible.  And, do my best not to think of all the months wasted by being depressed and hiding in bed.  I’ve said it before and I’m saying it again: Major Depressive Disorder sucks!  At least I’m okay for now, which is all one can hope for.  I’m even happy…I’m enjoying being busy and working on my project again!

Do yourself a favor and try something scary/exciting sometime.  It’s a great feeling and I think it’s good for the soul. 🙂

Still Sick But Did Get More Roof Enclosed Yesterday

The title says it all…and I didn’t feel well enough to take any pictures.  I guess I’ll be working in the cold and wet since it looks like I was sick through the whole last gasp of summer.  Not a pleasing thought, but eventually I’ll be past this stage and (kinda like childbirth) the pain will fade in memory and I’ll mostly remember challenges overcome and the personal touches made that went into making Oliver’s Nest my home sweet home.

I did find the picture showing the diagonal cut:

Here's the before.

Here’s the before.

Framing changes need to be made, but I like the look and now it's more aerodynamic.

Framing changes need to be made, but I like the look and now it’s more aerodynamic.

Interior Shot Of Angled Section

Yesterday I added the necessary framing for this angle portion, and covered it with plywood.

People are starting to take pictures and ask me questions when I’m out and about.  I want to encourage people to build their own Tiny Homes, and at the same time feel awkward about being social.  Fun times!

For Lack Of A 2×3….

Oliver’s Nest is this close to having a complete “roof” on it, well, not The Roof, just enough of one to allow easy tarping for any bad weather.  Except for needing a 2×3 for the angled portion in the cabover section, which I need in order to pre-prepare for the second planned skylight.  I could scrounge up enough change to purchase one, but I’m thinking that maybe I should put on another layer of paint, instead.  Also, I need a few more bits and pieces of lumber and plywood, so I feel I should save the gas money for buying it all at once.

I don’t really like to paint.  It’s messy and time-consuming.  So being “forced” to do it is maybe a good thing?  Plus, I can use up a 5 gallon lot of green paint for the under layers, using the gray as the final layer/s (I do NOT want a green house on a red truck.  I am not sorry).  I finally compiled all the painting supplies around this place and I have a ton of it.  Here’s the chance to put it to use!  I hate wasting things, and it’s here…even if I don’t particularly enjoy using it.  There are a lot of rollers, which should make this go faster than the brush I was using before.  I hope. 😉

The kitchen and family rooms are nearly empty.  I ran into a nice group of girls a few days ago who need stuff for their new home.  They happily took piles and piles of things, including nearly all of the Christmas stuff (there was so very much), pet supplies (mostly my mother’s), heaps of kitchen gadgets and dishware, lots picture frames, a bunch of vases, and a wing back chair.  Starting to get a picture of what I was dealing with yet?   It’s starting to feel spacious and … peaceful here.  I admit that some of the stuff that they took

Yeah, yeah, I know.  Gaps.  It's not finished yet. :)  The flashing has been pounded flat to enable the T1-11 and the windows to lay flat on the underlying plywood.

Yeah, yeah, I know. Gaps. It’s not finished yet. 🙂 The flashing has been pounded flat to enable the T1-11 and the windows to lay flat on the underlying plywood.

Doesn't look as weird now.  Can't wait for the two windows and the sheathing to go up!

Doesn’t look as weird now. Can’t wait for the two windows and the sheathing to go up!  The Beast is so tall that my head barely tops the hood. 😀

was mine, and what a relief to have it be gone!  I’m getting close to figuring out what I have room for in O.N. and getting it all organized.  I think I still have too much set aside, but with all this newly-acquired space to work with, I am now able to have it out and see what I really need.  Plus, it’s stuff I really like. 🙂

Our Late Summer Is Back And So Am I

Other than those unproductive days recently (reasonable in my view, given the death of a kitty I’d raised from practically birth), I’ve been feeling pretty good.  Obviously, meeting each day with a cheerful attitude feels great, but it also means more energy and creativity, and I get more accomplished.  This is a VERY GOOD THING. 😉
Over the last couple of days I’ve been busy building the skylight box.  It should be a fairly simple process, and with a solid plan, shouldn’t take much time.  Of course, this is *me* and it’s not been quite so straightforward.  There’s been a lot of sitting on the loft floor, looking up and just thinking options through, and sketching out ideas (before crumpling up the paper and starting over).  FINALLY I decided to just place the one and put off installing the second.  I’ll partially frame for the second skylight, and it won’t be hard to install it later.
Other than the one skylight, none of the windows will go in for now.  They are all framed in, but I’m just covering them all with cheap exterior plywood temporarily.  I want the house to be weathered-in, and I don’t know when I’ll have to leave here.
Pics!:

The framing for the two front windows has started, but those two spaces between the joists are potential skylight spots.

The framing for the two front windows has started. Those two spaces between the joists were potential spots, and the space between the front windows and the front joist is another.  If one is placed there, it’ll be set at a downward angle. 

Another view  of the joists, and there's the heavily-glued framing for the front windows. :)

Another view of the joists, and there’s the heavily-glued framing for the front windows. 🙂

The raised box isn't in, but essentially this is what it'll look like.  Having the skylight here gives me a ton of headroom where I climb up into the loft!

The raised box isn’t in, but essentially this is what it’ll look like. Having the skylight here gives me a ton of headroom where I climb up into the loft!

I’ve lost the picture showing how I chopped off those sharp front corners into a downward angle.  No way do I want to try to make a curved front…I over-reached there!  That angle for now will be covered with simple plywood, but eventually *might* be the location for the second skylight…and the entire visible front will have painted 8″ T1 11 covering it.

 Sigh….what a gorgeous day!
There’s a deep and pure blue sky over
head and excellent tunes playing on my Fire.
Someone over at Amazon really knows their music, what with Beck, The Beastie Boys, and the The
Black Keys mixed in with other fine bands. 😀
I haven’t hurt myself yet!
This is a good day.
The path light has come on and the tree frogs are starting their nightly chorus, so I’m done working
for the day. I hope your day went well, too!