Plywood Plank Walls

Here’s the thing.  Originally I was going to use the old barn wood somewhere in one of my builds, but after years of being stacked out in the weather it is all too far gone.  Plywood cut into planks (like you see on floors sometimes) seemed like a reasonable substitute, cheap, and easy to use.  Turns out this is all true.  It also turns out that if you use really really low-end plywood, the end result is not the sleek look I was expecting.  Instead, I’ve ended up with a rustic, cottage-y looking effect, which actually looks interesting.  So instead of this look found on http://www.domesticimperfection.com/2012/09/painted-plank-walls-finally/:

Plywood Plank walls

Smooth and lovely plywood plank walls

we have this:

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Interior walls up. The corners will have molding to hide the spaces!

It might be difficult to discern in the picture, but the walls are far from smooth.  Instead, each of the planks show what I like to call “personality”…bowing, sticking out a bit, and different textures.  Visitors and curious bystanders tell me it looks fine, so we’ll go with that.

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Caulking the plywood planked walls

A cool thing happened during this part of the build.  Those metal bars that angle up the walls?  In the way the entire time I’ve worked on this place.  I was more than pleased when the planks slid behind them and into the small space between them and the studs perfectly.  As in, I couldn’t have planned it better if I’d actually tried.  Lucky, lucky.

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Walls going in behind the metal bars.  And yes, that’s Leo photobombing.

I used 3″ screws to attach each board to the studs.  This house will be bouncing and jouncing on rough roads and tracks, and I don’t want anything popping loose.  I did my best to sink the heads and cover them with a silicone/latex caulk to hide them, but I wasn’t always successful.  Likewise with the ceiling.  Normal caulk like you would use in your normal house, didn’t cut it.  There was too much shrinking and cracking.  The caulk I used works better under these circumstances, and is relatively easy to smooth, and to build layers as needed.  It paints well, too.  Overall, I’m happy with the results.

OK!  Here’s the rub:  I wanted to mirror the colors on my favorite skirt, a lovely combination of oranges, pinks, yellows and greens.  It’s very summery and cheerful.  However, translating those colors to this space is not going as I envisioned, and here is the current look:

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OMG PINK

Yeah.  not what I was looking for.  Pepto, anyone?  The lightest pale yellow on the ceiling and upper walls just looks like old, yellowed white paint.  Argh!  What to do?

To start with, I’m going to paint over all the yellow with a bright, shiny white.  I realize glossy paints bring up imperfections, but this whole build is one giant imperfection so that really doesn’t matter.  Glossy paint reflects light, and in such a small space, light is very important.  Even that pale, pale yellow has visibly reduced the amount of  light I perceive.  I’ll paint the white down the walls to about 2/3s down, covering much of that pink.  At that point, I’ll start blending in the yellow.  Below that, I’ll blend in the oranges with a touch of red, and blend those down into the pink area.  I’m hoping for a sort of sunrise effect.  We’ll see how that goes!

Feel free to share your painting horror stories if you like in the comments.  We’ll all understand and sympathize.  🙂  I’m off to work some more on the new roof now, so talk at you all later. o/

 

Still Here, Just REALLY Busy

Things on the house are changing nearly daily, so I keep putting off posting anything.  Which is silly, because now I have a huge backlog of things to put up!  I’m trying to document what I’m doing with the build both for myself and for anyone out there who is crazy enough to attempt to do what I’m doing (only hopefully in a less janky manner..).

I *plan* on posting each project up separately, but here’s a quick and not-at-all complete update on where things are at:

  • Windows installed (and don’t leak!)
  • Metal roof caulked and then removed completely when I realized I have a leak….
  • Wet ceiling portion and insulation have been taken down, dried out, and are  re-installed.  I once again have to say that going to the extra work and expense of using wool insulation is totally worth it.  That stuff is pretty much indestructible
  • Leak has been located, exposed, and the area is almost completely dry
  • New roof sheathing is primed and ready to be installed, tomorrow I hope.  It will go on top of the original, absolutely fine except for lots of screw holes from the metal panels.  This will make it even stronger for when I can afford some solar
  • A second gallon of liquid rubber roofing is on it’s way.  I didn’t realize I didn’t have enough :p
  • The interior walls are all up, primed, and starting to get paint on them finally
  • The ceiling is almost finished with it’s multiple coats of paint as I bought a cheap brand.  I’m cool with that since a gallon is a lot for such a small space
  • The exterior of the house is nearly finished, and I think it will look pretty cool 😀
  • The interior design in sorted out and I’m looking forward to putting it together!

So that’s a bit of what’s been happening here.  Thanks for sticking with me through the long silences.  Not many of you comment (which you should, if you have any questions or thoughts on this whole thing) but I know you look at the posts.

A thank you! for my gaming buddy who donated to help me get new roof sheathing when he heard about the leak.  You’ve been great support, and I appreciate it very much.

Tired, going to play a game, listen to some Leonard Cohen, and pass out. Take care! o/