Wrote This Yesterday, Too Tired To Post It. LONG!

Recent rain has suited my mood perfectly. Gloomy through and through. The truck was covered by several tarps “just in case”, so at least I didn’t have to worry about it too…or so I thought. I guess a bit of wind must have picked up, and pulled the top tarp askew, allowing water access to the unprotected roof sheathing. Water made it’s way down through the wool insulation and into the ceiling. Sigh…but no permanent damage done. Wool is very forgiving. When sunshine peeked through yesterday, I pulled the tarp off to allow drying to start. According to Weatherbug, no more rain is predicted for a few days so I’ll leave the roof uncovered as long as possible.
My aching body and hand appreciate the break.
No laying around for me though! I’ve been using the indoor time to once again sort through the many piles of stuff I accumulated for the original Oliver’s Nest. It’s a bittersweet time, seeing the cool supplies for that build, many of which aren’t needed for the much smaller truck house. It’s doubtful i’ll manage to hang on to the trailer house, so I’m letting go of things I worked for years to gather. Hopefully there are people out there who can put them to good use. 😐 There’s always the option to re-donate items to a ReStore. I refuse to just dump them.
Of course, now if I need something for this build, it’s now easy to find. A huge plus.
Anyway, I now have a well organized and equipped tool box, my beading supplies are fitted into their own tool box, all the motorcycle gear is contained and ready for transferring to an eventual built-in, I’ve pared down clothing to fit into the space allotted, and on and so on. Still to go is going through all the kitchen supplies to get them down to an amount that will fit into my much-smaller kitchen space. That will be painful! I love to cook, both indoors and outdoors, which takes different equipment. I have to keep reminding myself that I don’t need all the specialty items I’d planned on. Just the basics! Well, I’m going to try to sneak in a few cool things. 😆
Another large and potentially painful project is letting go of a huge amount of computer and other electronic goodies. As an old computer builder and wannabe geek, hanging on to potentially useful bits and pieces is second nature. That simply won’t work. There are many used computer repair shops in town I’ll be donating supplies to.
I’m working my way through the food supplies as I have a ton of it in standby. Lots of interesting meals as a result again! I’m working towards eating the high fat, mid protein, low carb diet as soon as my cupboards are bare. Should be interesting on the road…. But some health issues dictate I try.
What else, what else… Ah. I made two templates for the skylights to try out placement of them. The actual skylights are HEAVY so I’m not interested in hefting them around 11 feet off the ground. I’ve fallen once and that’s plenty! What am I using for the skylights? Those beautiful old French doors. They are solid oak and I’m going over them pane by pane ensuring each seam is tight and well sealed. Once I have the funds I’m going to cover them with polycarbonate plastic sheets, well sealed. This is very strong stuff with the only downside that it scratches fairly easily. As the goal here is to protect the glass and to help keep water out, I can live with some possible marring. A little secret: I want at least the rear-most skylight to be able to open up towards the back end of the truck. That’ll allow easy access to the roof and more air flow inside. Unsure if the other skylight will open. The two front windows definitely will, and I’m excited about being able to sit on my bed but be mostly outside! Great emergency exit to the hood, too. So very many plans! Hold good thoughts that I will have at least another year here, OK? At my pace, I’ll need it! 😁
To end this rather lengthy update, I’ll fill you in on my current adventure. I’m writing this while sitting on a curb at a local store (looking for heavy-duty hinges), waiting for a tow truck to carry my little scooter home. I tried to get away with using her while gathering funds for her repair, which apparently was a bad idea! Yay, me!
Here’s hoping your day is going more smoothly than mine. 😉

What's going on here is that I've started framing in the two front windows and one of the skylights.  Lots and lots of glue!

What’s going on here is that I’ve started framing in the two front windows and one of the skylights. Lots and lots of glue!

Another Death In My Family

Harriet's favorite perch when we lived in the tiny tuck bed camper was the top of my coffee maker, especially when it was hot.  She always found the warm spots first, where ever we lived.

Harriet’s favorite perch when we lived in the tiny tuck bed camper was the top of my coffee maker, especially when it was hot. She always found the warm spots first, where ever we lived.

I’ve been working on Oliver’s Nest most every day, but with the recent death of the last of my furry triplets ~ this time Harriet ~ I just haven’t felt like posting.  I’ll do a big update soon though, promise.

Be well and keep your loved ones close.

Rain, Sun, Rain, Sun, Aaaagghhhh

It’s hard to know if it’s safe to paint when the weather is so variable, so I’m going through all my supplies again.  Lately I’ve spent a lot of time on Full-Time RVer sites, which now is close to my future plans.  The good ones go into great detail about what supplies and equipment they have found invaluable, and the list isn’t quite the same as a homesteader’s requirements.  With that, I will likely make some changes to what I’m going to bring along.  Luckily (well, unsurprising, considering how much stuff I have laying around) most of the recommended items are already here…somewhere!

I am now going to make an admission that I’ve kept hidden previously:  my mother was a hoarder, and I caught a little of that bug myself.  Thankfully, I’m a clean person who prefers a clean surrounding.  Therefore, all my own stuff is in tidy, but large, piles.  My mother wasn’t so much that way, and I’ve spent a huge amount of time going through all her things and cleaning.  At least she had a taste for nice things, so I’ve been able to sell much of it to help fund my project.  It does get tiring though, and lately I haven’t taken time to organize and sell more things.  I’m running out of money again so as the rainy season gets under way, I can add that to my “indoor jobs” list.

But, I need the rain to stay away for at least another week or two!  Building in the wet doesn’t seem optimal, and I’m not sure it’s even possible to paint in the rain.  I’m afraid I’ll find out. 😦  The roof still needs it’s coat of rubber, but that has to wait until all the skylights, windows, and the last of the roof itself is in.  The rubber *must* go on in decent weather.  Yikes!

I did manage to caulk all of the walls that are up, including sealing a couple seams I feel aren’t tight enough.  I used three different products for this:  Liquid Nails Extreme Heavy Duty, M-1 Structural Adhesive/Sealant, and Dap Dynaflex 230 Premium Indoor/Outdoor Sealant.  I used the Dap product on the screws and nails in order to secure them and to hide them for painting, and the other two for making sure suspect wood joins are strong.  That M-1 stuff is sooo sticky!  It took all of my strength to force it out of the tube!  It stays quite stretchy after drying, which in this use is a good thing.  It works in moist weather, which is another good thing. 🙂

Total cost of these three items was $3.00.  Two of the tubes were donated to my project, and the third I purchased (unopened) from a local ReStore.

Total cost of these three items was $3.00. Two of the tubes were donated to my project, and the third I purchased (unopened) from a local ReStore.

As I tried to place the screws evenly, it was quite easy to find them all, and caulking took all of an hour.  So nice to have something go well!

Ready to paint now.

Ready to paint now that the screws are caulked and the seams are sealed.

If the sky looks at all promising tomorrow, I plan on putting on the first coat of paint.  I was unable to find exterior primer, but with 5 gallons at my disposal, I should (hopefully) have enough paint to make several coats so the walls look good.  I hope latex paint likes moist weather….

The Beast tarped all over in case of rain.  Just little showers so far.

The Beast tarped all over in case of rain. Just little showers so far.

Tonight I will start the “fun” project of applying stripper to the windows.  Regardless of the claims that it’s safe to use indoors, I’m going to do it in a separate room with the window wide open.  I don’t want any fumes to go throughout the house, both for my sake and my furry friends.

My latest purchases, made after a marathon 3-days of research, were these: a 2-input monitor, this camera, and this camera.  Both cameras are very similar, so I got one of each to compare.  I love the options on them!  So hoping I am able to manage the installation myself, as otherwise it’ll have to wait until I gather a little more moola. 🙂  So much to do!

Hope you are all busy with fun projects too.

Still Awaiting Batteries, But Found My Kitchen Cabinets

So I’ve done a possibly bad thing, but for a good reason.  My terrific Insurance company sent me the check to fix my poor lil scooter, and I’ve gone and used some of the money for Oliver’s Nest.  I have time to get Saxith (yes, I name all my vehicles) fixed, but I don’t know if I have a lot of time to get my truck house finished.  Seems like a no-brainer to do what is the most important *now* and wait on the rest.

I was at another local ReStore yesterday looking for exterior primer, and found the perfect kitchen cabinets, and after measuring and thinking (I even finally sat right down on the floor in contemplation, LOL), went for it and bought them.  They are in perfect condition and are the perfect size to hold most of my kitchen goods, minus food and large equipment, which I’ll keep in a separate pantry area.  They are likely from an older home, as they are old-fashioned looking, with lovely glass-front doors.  The hinges are loose and need adjusting, but undamaged.  Of course they could use a new paint job.  I really like the small, rounded shelves at the ends  Here’s a picture of the upper cabinets:

This section is 13" deep and 30" tall, giving a respectable 16" between it's bottom and the countertop below.

This section is 13″ deep and 30″ tall, giving a respectable 16″ between it’s bottom and the counter top below.  Normally there is an 18″ space, but everything is smaller in Oliver’s Nest.

The other section is technically also an upper cabinet, but will instead sit down on the floor, on a base I’ll build.  This section is a corner unit, 24″ by 24″ with another set of little shelves attached on the left side.  I’ll have to remove the top shelf and part of the left-hand top of the main cabinet as the sink will sit directly above and is fairly deep  All the pots/pans/smaller cooking supplies will fit.Here’s what this part looks like:

Once set on a short base, this cabinet will tuck under the counter sink, on the floor.  I might even create a flat pan/cutting board storage in the base.

Once set on a short base, this cabinet will tuck under the counter sink, on the floor. I might even create a flat pan/cutting board storage in the base.

This view was taken standing behind the cabinet.  The flat part along the upper side is the glass-front doors.

This view was taken standing behind the cabinet. The flat part with the blue tape is the glass-front cabinet doors.

I’m also doing research on backup cameras, as I have zero visibility behind me.  The Beast is wider than most other vehicles, which means I simply don’t see them behind me unless they cast a shadow….not good!  Changing lanes is “thrilling”, and backing up is downright frightening.  Wide field-of-view, low-light/infrared cameras are available for very little cost, and as there’s no stereo installed anyway, I’ll just look for one that has a monitor included that can be used to show the camera’s view.  I don’t know how to tell if the truck needs new speakers.  It doesn’t make sense to get a whole system and not be able to use a major function, so I’ll look for good quality speakers on sale, just in case.  I don’t know how to install any of this, but will give it a go to save on installation costs. If anyone out there has recommendations on any of this electronic stuff, please feel free to share. 🙂

Oh, I want to mention that the rerouted fuel intakes are working as intended.  I filled the front tank a few days ago and the flow was smoother and faster, and no leaks.  Phew.  Thank you, Son, for your help there, I couldn’t have done it without you!

So it’s off to paint I go.  This is all so exciting to me!

May your day go well ~

Parker

Frustrated!

I found the saw.  However.  It won’t cut through the thick wood of the second french door, so I can’t access that broken pane to replace it.  It *does* work on the plywood panels, but my extension cord can’t reach to the truck so I can’t use the electric screwdriver/drill to attach them.  Therefore, I’m out of business until the new batteries come in.  And rain is coming….dammit.

I hope today is going better for you than me!

Taking Advantage Of The Late Summer Weather

Well.  It’s always something, right?  I’m now down to a single battery for my 18 volt Makita tools, which ISN’T ENOUGH JUICE!  Plus, the last battery seems to be on it’s last legs.  So, onto Amazon to purchase a couple more.  Three was perfect, but I bought a two-pack which should get me through to the end of this build.  In the meantime…

I’m pulling out all of the wool insulation from where it’s been stored for the last (too many) years, and spreading it out on tarps to get any last soggy bits dried out.  There’s so much of it!  As the mounds dry I’ll pack it into large garbage bags to store inside, now that I have an inside to store stuff in. 🙂

I’m working on the reclaimed windows, sanding them down, making repairs to ensure the glass is in there securely, and stripping the multiple layers of paint off in preparation of painting them.  It’s a task that’s needed to be done, and I’d rather do it outside anyway.  The stripper I have is supposedly OK to use indoors, but fresh air is always better, in my opinion.

And, until the last battery gives out, I’m slowly (oh, so slowly) cutting down the french doors into windows.  Yep!  If I’m able to keep my original Tiny House on the trailer, I’ll just buy another set.  For now, I have a plan for this set, which I’m not going to share yet, in case it’s a disaster.  I can only take so much public humiliation, you know?  Either the wood is really solid and heavy, or the single surviving battery really is dying, as it’s taking forever to cut, and the battery is only lasting a few minutes of laborious work, plus is getting really hot.  I might have an electric circular saw around here somewhere…I’ll have to look tomorrow.  I have an electric drill for sure.  Gosh I hope the battery lasts for a few more days, until the new ones come.

So that’s it.  Enjoying the weather, and making the best use of it that I can.  I’m staying out of bed, feeling pretty OK with life right now, and other than a very sore hand, getting over the scooter crash in good time.  Life is not too bad!

UPDATE:  This morning, I was gathering my tools together, and my last battery has died.  Sure hope I can find that circular saw I thought I saw somewhere….

A few pictures:

Here's the first french door to be cut down.

Here’s the first french door to be cut down.  Being old doors, the wood is loose already, so I’ll need to tighten things up.  The other door has a broken pane and I’ll deal with that after cutting it down, as it will be much easier to get the glass out then.

And here it is after being cut down and glued with Liquid Nails. You can see the two clamps pulling it tight together while the glue dries. Then I'll strip the paint off and reseal the glazing to make sure it stays put. I like the proportions!

And here it is after being cut down and glued with Liquid Nails. You can see the two clamps pulling it tight together while the glue dries. Then I’ll strip the paint off and reseal the glazing to make sure it stays put. I like the proportions!

Salty, Salty Words

I would like to think I am a decent person, with good manners and a sense of decorum.  Not today!!!  Working with heavy wood above my head sends me into a swearing aria!  I’m really hoping most of the neighbors weren’t home, and definitely glad I am in a country setting so no other houses are too close.  Tonight I’m a little worn out, and I can’t tell if it’s because I got a lot done, or if it’s because I drained my energy dry from all the cussing.

At least I didn’t drop anything on my head or toes today. 🙂

Sigh.  I don’t have a “pretty” blog….

Anyway, more progress!  Approximately half of the ceiling/roof insulation/roof sheathing is done.  There is about 6″ of insulation in the floor, and 6″ in the roof.  That should really help with climate control and somewhat with sound buffering.  I have so much of the wool left that I can really pack it in to the walls when I get to that step.

Some pictures of today’s work:

Fitted the joist headers (I think that's what they're called).  Used liquid nails as well as screws, as this part of the house needs to be really strong.

Fitted the joist headers (I think that’s what they’re called). Used liquid nails as well as screws, as this part of the house needs to be really strong.  The yellow bucket is 5 gallons of gray paint I purchased at one of the nearby ReStores.  Score!

I love the wool insulation.  I don't love breathing in all the little hair fibers. :)

I love the wool insulation. I don’t love breathing in all the little hair fibers. 🙂

Sundown and being tired forced me to stop at about the halfway point.

Sundown and being tired forced me to stop at about the halfway point.

A Little Help Is A Beautiful Thing

I have maybe a hundred (or more) feet of metal strapping that I'm using to beef up the wall strength.

I have maybe a hundred (or more) feet of metal strapping that I’m using to beef up the wall strength.

I'll attach more strapping to the inside of the studs when my hand heals. It was hard to get the stuff up tight.

I’ll attach more strapping to the inside of the studs when my hand heals. It was hard to get the stuff up tight.

To keep the window rough framing boards in place I used clamps. Solo builders, invest in multiple sizes of them, you won't regret it.

To keep the window rough framing boards in place I used clamps. Solo builders, invest in multiple sizes of them, you won’t regret it.

Almost finished framing in the rough openings for the windows along the back wall. I accidentally bent the wood on the left lower side which will need careful placement of shims to correct.

Almost finished framing in the rough openings for the windows along the back wall. I accidentally bent the wood on the left lower side which will need careful placement of shims to correct.

Finally got around to bolting down the cabover. With my new drill bit it went much faster than in the bed area.

Finally got around to bolting down the cabover. With my new drill bit it went much faster than in the bed area.  I do need to deal with the antenna as it doesn’t fit now.

I precut the exterior siding. My neighbors agreed to help me attach it so I didn't need to do so before attaching the framing.

I pre-cut the exterior siding. My neighbors agreed to help me attach it so I didn’t need to do so before attaching the framing.  This is “utility” grade sheathing, so there are lots of imperfections.  Some will be hidden by paint, some by trim.

The driver's side sheathing is in place! I didn't pre-cut the section just back of the truck door in case of last-minute adjustments. Turns out it fit perfectly so I could have pre-cut it.

The driver’s side sheathing is in place! I didn’t pre-cut the section just back of the truck door in case of last-minute adjustments. Turns out it fit perfectly so I could have pre-cut it.

Two sheets of sheathing also fit perfectly. Yay!

Two sheets of sheathing also fit perfectly. Yay!

The two lovely neighbors who contributed about 2 1/2 hours to hold up the sheathing while I attached it.

The two lovely neighbors who contributed about 2 1/2 hours to hold up the sheathing while I attached it.  One thing to note is the too-short sheathing on the cabover section.  I placed a drip edge under that part, and will put in short pieces of sheathing underneath the drip edge to keep water out.  Then, trim will cover that whole area and hide my mistake. 🙂

It was a simple task to cut the sheathing on the driver's side even after attaching it.

It was a simple task to cut the sheathing on the driver’s side even after attaching it.

I'll build little doors to cover the fuel inlets.

I’ll build little doors to cover the fuel inlets.

Leo decided to photo-bomb. :) Visible on the upper right is a gap showing that I managed to mis-measure this wall by an inch, so the two long walls don't exactly match lengths. Sigh.

Leo decided to photo-bomb. 🙂 Visible on the upper right is a gap showing that I managed to mis-measure this wall by an inch, so the two long walls don’t exactly match lengths. Sigh.

I am still unsure of how I want to handle the front of the cabover. I want a big window view that also opens for an emergency exit.

I am still unsure of how I want to handle the front of the cabover. I want a big window view that also opens for an emergency exit.

2x6 roof joists attached but still need to buy the 2x6 header pieces. I used leftover lumber to ensure spacing so I can slide the header lumber in between the butts of the joists and the exterior sheathing.

2×6 roof joists attached but still need to buy the 2×6 joist header pieces. I used leftover lumber to ensure spacing so I can slide the header lumber in between the butts of the joists and the exterior sheathing.

This is another picture-heavy post with fewer words.  It still hurts to type, especially after all that work!  Totally worth it, however, to see Oliver’s Nest looking more homey.  I’m getting lots of comments from people now when I take the truck out on errands, as well as from passers-by who stop and ask questions while I’m working.  It’s cool that so many people know this will be a house, not just a camper.  I’m hearing a lot of praise for the quality of this build.  It’s also really fun to answer the number one question:  “Who are you having build this?”  Answer: Me!

I’m Not Alone!

I recently found a great blog, and have been browsing through it for the last few days.  I’ve just found the Best Post Ever there and want to link to it for your enjoyment:

via Houston, We Have a Problem – Wheeling It.

I love this post because I’ve had (too) many monumental issues and goofs this past year, and somewhere along the way lost my sense of humor and even my confidence about it all.  For some reason, reading about this lovely lady’s “incident” has made me feel better about myself ~ always a win!

I  highly recommend you check out her blog Wheeling It if you appreciate a good laugh, even if you aren’t living the Full-Time Mobile Life.   She’s got a way with words and takes great pictures to enjoy. 🙂

No pictures today for this little post. 🙂  Lots coming up for the next Oliver’s Nest update though…stay tuned!

Hard To Post Lately.

Why has it been hard?  Two reasons:  the first is that I was scared off the road on my scooter by a *very* close encounter with a deer and crashed, and the second is my old nemesis, my mood disorder.  I’ve decided to try powering through that, and despite being a bit smooshed from the accident, have gotten a bunch done.  This will be a picture-heavy post because my hand hurts 🙂

Thank goodness for insurance!

Thank goodness for insurance!

The trade-off for light weight is plastic body panels that crack and break easily.

The trade-off for light weight is plastic body panels that crack and break easily.

To keep this post safe for everyone I won't show ALL my damaged bits!

To keep this post safe for everyone I won’t show ALL my damaged bits!

I sprained my ankle and one of my fingers.  Ouch.

I sprained my ankle and one of my fingers. Ouch.

Done, Done, Done!

Front fuel line mod is now Done, Done, Done!

Having something to trace the proper curve really helped.  Freestyle tends to get me into trouble!

Having something to trace the proper curve really helped. Freestyle tends to get me into trouble!

Still to be done is framing for the windows on the rear, and all the very front and roof framing.

Still to be done is framing for the windows on the rear, and all the very front and roof framing.

Tried to get a good picture of my pup but he wouldn't stay still. :)

Tried to get a good picture of my pup Hank but he wouldn’t stay still. 🙂

Tried to get a nice pic of Leo too, but he wanted to head-butt me instead....

Tried to get a nice pic of Leo too, but he wanted to head-butt me instead….

He finally stood still for me!  I love that he keeps me company while I work (and swear, and cry, and finally fist-pump when I get something done).

He finally stood still for me! I love that he keeps me company while I work (and swear, and cry, and finally fist-pump when I get something done).